Robinia neomexicana is quite common in New Mexico and Arizona, and makes a few showy incursions into Colorado.The tree is often planted as an ornamental on lawns and, as here shown, along highways. New Mexico locust (Robinia neomexicana) should have been called the southwestern locust because this small tree thrives in mountains throughout the southwestern United States. New Mexico Locust - Robinia neomexicana In spite of its name, this locust is actually primarily found across the southwestern United States. As a primary invader, New Mexico locust quickly establishes on … . This species fills a successional role in post-disturbance situations. The wood is hard, heavy, and durable, but trees seldom grow large enough to be sawed into lumber. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The Plants Database includes the following 2 subspecies of Robinia neomexicana .Click below on a thumbnail map or name for subspecies profiles. The bark of the tree is greyish brown and smooth, but becomes furrowed as the plant ages. Robinia neomexicana is a deciduous Tree growing to 2 m (6ft 7in) at a medium rate. TREE: Usually a large shrub or occasionally a small tree reaching several meters in height. Deciduous, hardwood trees, growing from 30 to 70 high. Whole Plant. The New Mexico locust tree, or Robinia neomexicana, isn’t a Mexican tree, contrary to its name. In late spring, it is easily identified by its pendulous clusters of fragrant, pink flowers. R. neomexicana is native to the Southwestern United States (southeastern California and southwestern Utah, Virgin River region,[2] east through Arizona and New Mexico, the Rio Grande valley, to far west Texas) and adjoining northern Mexico; from central New Mexico the range extends north into Colorado, mostly the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Instead, you will primarily find them in the South Western parts of the United States. Distinguish New Mexico locust (Robinia neomexicana, hardy in USDA zones 4 through 8) by its small size, usually around 6 1/2 to 15 feet tall, although they can reach 25 feet high. The flowers of New Mexico locust make it instantly recognizable as a member of the pea family. Jul 13, 2013 - New Mexico Locust tree for our front yard. [6] The pods were also eaten raw and cooked by some Native Americans, such as the Mescalero and Chiricahua Apache. Brick and Pavers. Growing strong in zones 4-8, the New Mexico Locust produces pretty pink flower clusters that are nearly four inches long. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The New Mexico State tree is the Pinyon Pine. A champion New Mexico Locust in the Coconino National Forest is 27 meters tall! BLOG. The flowers are showy and white or pink, and considered fragrant. Like many members of the pea family, New Mexico Locust has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that live in nodules in the plant’s roots. New Mexico Locust A drought-tolerant member of the pea family, the New Mexico locust is a small tree that grows throughout most of the Southwestern U.S., favoring foothill ecosystems. It is often found in pure stands in forest openings and can dominate shortly after a fire because of its vigorous root sprouting. ." ." Source Wikipedia Photo by Charlie McDonald. It is among the first woody plants to grow after wildfires but is soon shaded out by taller trees. The leaves are 10–15 cm long, pinnate with 7–15 leaflets; they have a pair of sharp, reddish-brown thorns at the base. Robinia pseudoacacia is a deciduous Tree growing to 25 m (82ft) by 15 m (49ft) at a fast rate. June 5, 2013. Tree: Native Status: L48 N: Data Source and Documentation: About our new maps. The Robinia Pseudoacacia is commonly known as the Black Locust, False Acacia, Green Locust, Locust, Post Locust, Shipmast Locust, White Locust as well as Yellow Locust.. This is a native tree especially useful for erosion control due to its rapid growth and thicket forming tendencies. US Forest Service, FM-RM-VE The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs). Along Highway 491, Arriola and south. The New Mexico Locust is a rare spiny shrub or small tree that can grow to heights of 20 ft or more especially if trained/shaped to a single trunk. New Mexico Locust - Robinia neomexicana In spite of its name, this locust is actually primarily found across the southwestern United States. [4], In New Mexico, Pueblo Native Americans traditionally ate the flowers uncooked. Once full grown they can reach a height of 30-50 feet and 20-35 feet in spread. Our small locust tree if eight years has a trunk that has gradually grown black! It can be grown as a tree or a shrub, growing to around 10 feet in height. Type: Deciduous flowering shrub or small tree. Create New Wish List × Product Overview. Robinia neomexicana, the New Mexican, New Mexico, Southwest, Desert, Pink, or rose locust), is a shrub or small tree in the subfamily Faboideae of the pea family Fabaceae. Orchard Tree. The fruits are brown bean-like pods with bristles. Mailstop Code: 1103 . This is New Mexico Locust ( Robinia neomexicana ) at the 260 Trailhead east of Payson Arizona. (970) 765-0670 info@coloradohardyplants/com Unlike many fast-growing trees, though, the honey locust does not have invasive roots or weak wood. Robinia neomexicana (New Mexico Locust) Fabaceae (Pea Family) Semi-desert, foothills.Meadows, streamsides, lawns. Washington DC 20250-1103, Pollinator-Friendly Best Management Practices, Native Plant Material Accomplishment Reports, Fading Gold: The Decline of Aspen in the West, Wildflowers, Part of the Pagentry of Fall Colors, Tall Forb Community of the Intermountain West, Strategic Planning, Budget And Accountability, Recreation, Heritage And Volunteer Resources, Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Air And Rare Plants. This locust tree species can grow into a tree or a shrub and it reaches heights of about 10 feet with beautiful purple branches and flower batches that bloom in spring and summer. It’s actually found mostly in the Southwest of the United States. The fruits are brown bean-like pods with bristles. It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from November to March. It also tolerates salt, foot traffic, pollution a… The specific epithet, neomexicana, is the Latinized form of New Mexico, one of the locations where the plant is found. Type: Deciduous flowering shrub or small tree. New Mexico locust (Robinia neomexicana)By Charlie McDonald. Robinia neomexicana, New Mexico Locust Blossom -- Image by kenne The New Mexico Locust are in full bloom on Mt. Like many members of the pea family, New Mexico Locust has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that live in nodules in the plant’s roots.
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