Dratted industry and their shipping lives, appearance over taste, money over environmental responsibility; dratted consumers and our being trapped in busy schedules, cheap produce, the quick&easy, the short range. We study botany because plants have a lot of information to share with us. Clearly the number four has no such associations for Michael Pollan. Caffeine: How coffee and tea created the modern world, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Young Readers Edition. He is very emotional and at the same time very scientific and logic. Michael Pollan has convinced me to buy only organic potatoes from now on. Four common plants and I didn't know they each held such a rich history. this was like NPR in printed form, and felt intended to be read in that medium. and the bees were working above me. He chronicles the potato (sustenance), the tulip (beauty), cannabis (pleasure), and the apple (sweetness). It is a stunning insight, and no one will come away from this book without having their ideas of nature stretched and challenged. Johnny Appleseed’s efforts were to the overwhelming advantage of apple genetic proliferation, and the science of mass potato farming means more seeds are planted every year. —The New York Times, “[Pollan] has a wide-ranging intellect, an eager grasp of evolutionary biology and a subversive streak that helps him to root out some wonderfully counterintuitive points. In The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, Pollan builds on his former work and demonstrates how humans and plants have formed reciprocal relationships. The conversation between history, literature and science really interests me, though, which is why nearly all of the books I read fall into one of those categories. Chef, writer, and cookbook author Samin Nosrat's first book Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking not only... Every schoolchild learns about the mutually beneficial dance of honeybees and flowers: The bee collects nectar and pollen to make honey and, in the process, spreads the flowers’ genes far and wide. He talks about 4 crops: apples, potatoes, tulips and marijuana, and the interactions between them and humans: history, culture, human psychology, and science, etc. just as a warning, the below is not really about the book by pollan at all (which is great, btw! Pollan takes his readers on an odyssey through the natural histories of four plants that have been important to the course of human history, and relates them to a certain form of desire that he believes to be inherent in each and every person. it's all grotesquely bucolic, and the lack of any synthesis at the end left me underwhelmed. We first came to understand the way cells work through botany. He chronicles the potato (sustenance), the tulip (beauty), cannabis (pleasure), and the apple (sweet. Best of all, Pollan really loves plants.” A brief but compelling history of four plants whose genetic destiny has been markedly altered by man – the apple, the tulip, cannabis, and the potato. You might not think the story of a plant would be very compelling, but as our Plaza Branch Barista’s Book Club learned, Pollan intrigues readers through careful management of historical facts, research, and personal anecdotes. In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. But we’ll get to the argument bit in a minute. Making my little rows and putting in my chunks. This is an enjoyable book that wanders back and forth through the subjects of botany, history, and literary philosophy. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Botany of Desire at Amazon.com. This may be my favorite Pollan book of all time. We study botany because plants have a lot of information to share with us. 3.5 stars, 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat' Author Shares Some Favorite Cookbooks. But we’l. And I was planting potatoes. I knew nothing much about botany and have never been particularly interested in that branch of science, but this book was a very easy read and I found it extremely fascinating. This is a marvellous book, which discusses the science, sociology, aesthetics and culture, relating to four plants. This is because it sounds a bit like the word for death. The chapters on the apple, tulip, and potato offer cautionary evidence on the danger of destroying diversity in the name of commerce. Pollan’s argument is that, though we see domestication as a strictly top-down, subject-to-object process, there really may also be some co-evolutionary force at work. These ingredients would be combined in a hempseed-oil-based "flying ointment" that the witches would then administer vaginally using a special dildo. But we know that this is just a … Pollan's The Botany of Desire is by far one of the best books I have ever read, and it is one of those books that has changed my world view for the better. what? I couldn't get into this book at all and gave up reading it after the first chapter. ), to only eat organic food, and to find out the story and origin of every morsel of food I put in my body. I called it quits when he started analogizing Johnny Appleseed and Dionysius. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published The Botany of Desire The domestication of animals has given us many advantages such as four-legged hunting partners, faster means of transportation, and the convenience of plucking the day’s meal out of the backyard rather than risking life and limb tracking it for miles. Michael Pollan takes a simple question - Have we domesticated plants or have plants domesticated us?- and to make a case for the latter, provides us with a heady mix of history,science,philosophy,botany,literature and w. This is the best piece of anything that I've ever read on gardening, even though its not entirely on gardening. Pollan’s argument is that, though we see domestication as a strictly top-down, subject-to-object process, there really may also be some co-evolutionary force at work. The Botany Of Desire Review The only complaint I have about The Botany Of Desire is that the title is misleading. Pollan takes his readers on an odyssey through the natural histories of four plants that have been important to the course of human history, and relates them to a certain form of desire that he believes to be inherent in each and every person. Well, I was kind of familiar with marijuana's development (not from personal toking, honest Asian, but from being surrounded by tokers - hey, it was Oregon) and that it was completely villified in the "just say no" era of drug awareness education. As beguiling as the plants this book enlightened me about. the potato chapter was great, the marijuana chapter irritating, the tulip chapter needlessly verbose (but full of some of the book's best trivia), the apple chapter...quixotic. I took many a too-long lunch break because I was so hooked. (119)”, Borders Original Voices Award for Nonfiction (2001). I had it sit in my library of blinks for a while, thinking it had something to do with how plants influence sex, for example explaining aphrodisiacs. June 12th 2001 ), to only eat organic food, and to find out the story and origin of every morsel of food I put in my body. Pollan represents one of my favorite types of writers: modern polymaths who can bring scientific, historic and literary knowledge to bear on whatever they're writing about. Aside from making me incredibly sad at not having a garden patch anymore in my home and having to contend with purchased pots and soil, this book was a delightful read. Book Review: The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World. “Pollan shines a light on our own nature as well as our implication in the natural world.” This was a total surprise, and a great one. To see what your friends thought of this book, Pollan is sometimes whimsical ... he writes in a way that is like no other author. Johnny Appleseed’s efforts were to the overwhelming advantage of apple genetic proliferation, and the science of mass potato farming means more seeds are planted every year. Even the description made it look doubtful that it would be my cup of tea. His prose both shimmers and snaps, and he has a knack for finding perfect quotes in the oddest places. The Botany of Desire is obviously trying to entice people into watching a … Michael Pollan wrote beautifully, made extremely valid points, and explained each plant in Okay, okay, books by Michael Pollan are clearly a fad right now, but I have bought into it whole-heartedly. Gave it as a gift on a couple of. Dratted industry and their shipping lives, ap. We’d love your help. "A bumblebee would probably... regard himself as a subject in the garden and the bloom he's plundering for its drop of nectar as an object. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World at Amazon.com. He is an amazing, amazing writer: he makes me want to plant a garden, to tour his garden (his bedroom? His prose is unrivaled, and he draws readers into his narrative with seamless ease. Inside you'll find 30 Daily Lessons, 20 Fun Activities, 180 Multiple Choice Questions, 60 Short Essay Questions, 20 Essay “The Botany of Desire” is Mr. Pollan’s first book to be adapted for television and, he says, his favorite of all his works. When it's done well, I don't care what the question is; for instance, tulips aren't really my thing, despite their presence on my dining room table right now. Mark A Super Reviewer Feb 24, 2010 Lopsided and a bit misdirected, but overall entertaining and informative. by Random House, The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World. Pollan presents case studies that mirror four types of human desires that are reflected in the way that we selectively grow, breed, and genetically engineer our plants. The Botany of Desire is my favorite of Pollan's book-length works, and his lecture is a lovely taste of the book as a whole. To that last end, I found the chapter on Johnny Appleseed very enlightening as well as highly entertaining. It also sets the stage nicely for O.D. An example of the later is quoted below: everyone, unless they loathe all non-fiction, I really enjoyed this book (and enjoyed the lecture I attended when the author talked about the book and answered questions.) He masterfully links four fundamental human desires--sweetness, beauty —Los Angeles Times, “Until I read Michael Pollan’s original, provocative and charming The Botany of Desire, I had never managed to get inside the soul of a plant. Gave it as a gift on a couple of occasions after I read it. Too much navel-gazing and not enough substance. —Chicago Tribune, “Funny, interesting and as delicious as a slice of summer peach … a must for people who like a good story.” This book had highs and lows but I the "strange" aspect is a reflection of emotional tone and style, The Omnivores dilemma was my favorite book of his. Mr. Pollan’s discussion of the genetically engineered NewLeaf potato, which was devised to resist its most dreaded enemy, the Colorado potato beetle, is a lucid and balanced assessment of this new horticultural technology, a subject too often tackled with barely muffled hysteria.” Instead, he lets you get what he is saying while at the same time telling an engaging, well-researched story, both personal and historic, and one that made me want to read quickly to the very end. He talks about 4 crops: apples, potatoes, tulips and marijuana, and the interactions between them and humans: history, culture, human psychology, and science, etc. These are merely the standard tools available to the plant for survival and procreation.
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